First Round of Pilot Rental Initiative Completed with 2,500 Homes Sold

The first round of winners has been
selected to purchase foreclosed real estate from Freddie Mac and Fannie
Mae.  The Federal Housing Finance Agency
(FHFA) announced today that 2,500 single family homes had been awarded to successful
bidders under a pilot initiative to convert real estate acquired by the two
government sponsored enterprises (GSE) through foreclosure into rental property. 

Successful candidates for purchasing properties
from the GSE’s real estate portfolio (REO) had undergone several steps in a
qualification process before being permitted to bid on the houses which they had
to agree to hold and rent for a period of time before reselling. 

The properties were offered in sale
pools which were geographically concentrated in various locations across the
United States.  The GSEs, FHFA and other federal
agencies involved, Departments of Treasury, Housing and Urban Development,
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and the Federal Reserve, had several
goals
for the program.  They hoped to
relieve the GSEs of the costs and administrative burdens of managing thousands
of foreclosed properties, alleviate the blight imposed on communities by large
number of vacant and possibly deteriorating properties, increase the rental
stock, while at the same time not flooding the market with distressed
properties.

 FHFA described the response to the pilot
initiative as “robust with strong qualified bidder interest.”  Some 4,000 responses were received to the
initial “Request for Information” issued by the program sponsors last February,
however beyond announcing that the awards had been made FHFA released no
information on the names or even the numbers of successful bidders.

“FHFA
undertook this initiative to help stabilize communities and home values in
areas hard-hit by the foreclosure crisis,” said Edward J. DeMarco, Acting
Director of FHFA. “As conservator of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, we believe
this pilot program will assist us in achieving our objectives and help to
maximize the benefit to taxpayers. We are pleased with the response from the
market and look forward to closing transactions in the near future.”

…(read more)

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David H. Stevens Staying at MBA

Slightly more than a month after it confirmed
he was leaving his post as President and CEO, the Mortgage Bankers Association
(MBA) announced that David H. Stevens would remain at the head of the trade
association.  Steven’s resignation and
appointment as president of Sun Trust Mortgage was announced by both MBA and
the parent company of his new employer, Sun Trust Bank, on May 30.  The announcement came almost simultaneous
with Steven’s first year anniversary with MBA.

In a statement released this morning MBA
said they were pleased to announce that Stevens “has agreed to stay on as
President and CEO.”  MBA Chairman Michael
W. Young said that, “Over the past several
weeks, MBA’s leadership, members and staff impressed upon Dave the important
role he was playing for the industry and his unique qualifications to lead the
association.  The importance and
significance of MBA’s voice during this critical time coupled with Dave’s
experience and talents encouraged us to do all we could to retain him.”

“The past few weeks have been extremely
difficult for me personally and professionally,” Stevens said.  “After serious thought and consideration, I
simply cannot leave the MBA at such a critical time for the industry and the
association.  Frankly, at the end of the
day, stepping away now when so much progress is being made and so much still
left to be done, did not feel right.

 “Going
through this experience left me encouraged by the tremendous opportunity that
lies within our industry and reinforced the essential component mortgage
finance will continue to play in helping our nation’s economy recover.” he
noted.  

Stevens joined MBA in May 2011 after serving as Assistant
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development and Commissioner of the Federal
Housing Administration (FHA). 

Mr. Stevens was to have joined the Company on July 16, reporting to SunTrust Mortgage President and CEO Jerome Lienhard.

“We have a strong leadership team in place, and continue to execute our business plan and serve the needs of the clients of SunTrust Mortgage,” said Mr. Lienhard.

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Proposal to Seize Underwater Mortgages via Eminent Domain not Well Received

The Board of Supervisors in the California county of San Bernardino has,
perhaps unintentionally, picked a fight with some of the giants of the real
estate industry.  The Board unanimously
approved a plan two weeks ago that would use eminent domain to seize underwater
mortgages
and restructure them for homeowners unable to sell or refinance the properties.

The Homeowner Protection Program, in which San Bernardino would partner with
the cities of Ontario and Fontana within its borders, is only broadly sketched
out at present but it has already provoked a strong reaction from the Securities Industry and Financial Markets
Association (SIFMA).  SIFMA claims to
represent the interests of hundreds of securities firms, banks and asset
managers.  The trade association fired
off a letter to the Board on Friday, cosigned by more than a dozen of its
member organizations, protesting the proposed actions.  “Based on publicly available information on
the Agreement,” the letter said, “we are very concerned that the good
intentions of the Board of Supervisors will instead result in significant harm
to the residents the Agreement intends to help.”

The thrust of the letter is that such an action as proposed in San
Bernardino would significantly reduce access to credit for mortgage borrowers.  “If eminent domain were used to seize loans,
investors in these loans through mortgage-backed securities or their investment
portfolios would suffer immediate losses and likely be reluctant to provide
future funding to borrowers in these areas. 
It is essential to remember that investors in mortgage-backed securities
channel the retirement and other savings of everyday citizens through their
investment funds.  This program may cause
loans to be excluded from securitizations, and some portfolio lenders could
withdraw from these markets.  In other
words, this program could actually serve to further depress housing values in
the county by restricting the flow of credit to home buyers”

The Los Angeles Times quotes David
Wert, a spokesman for the county as saying the country would use eminent domain
to condemn mortgages on properties that are underwater, that is the owner owns
more on the mortgage than the value of the home, and would then renegotiate the
mortgages at a lower amount.  Only
homeowners who are current on their mortgage payments would be eligible for the
program.

The move is intended to help stimulate the region’s hard-hit economy by
freeing up people who have been stuck in their homes, Wert said. “Real estate
is the foundation of the inland economy, 
 [It] is based on the building and
selling of homes, and this is one way to stimulate that again.”

The program is still in its initial stages and additional details will be
hashed out in public the spokesman on said. 

Among those signing the SIFMA letter one were the Mortgage Bankers
Association, American Bankers Association, National Association of Realtors®,
The Financial Services Roundtable, American Securitization Forum, and the
Residential Servicing Coalition.

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HUD SECRETARY ANNOUNCES DISASTER ASSISTANCE FOR COLORADO FIRE VICTIMS

WASHINGTON – U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan today announced HUD will speed federal disaster assistance to the State of Colorado and provide support to homeowners and low-income renters forced from their homes due to the ongoing High Park and Waldo Canyon wildfires this month.

OCC Notes Fewer Banks Tightening Underwriting Standards

The Office of Comptroller of the Currency
(OCC) recently completed its 18th annual “Survey of Credit
Underwriting Practices
.” The survey seeks to identify trends in lending
standards
and credit risks for the most common types of commercial and retail
credit offered by National Banks and Federal Savings Associations (FSA).  The latter was included for the first time in
this year’s survey.

The survey covers OCC’s examiner
assessments of underwriting standards at 87 banks with assets of three billion
dollars or more.  Examiners looked at
loan products for each company where loan volume was 2% or more of its
committed loan portfolio.  The survey covers
loans totaling $4.6 trillion as of December 31, 2011, representing 91% of total
loans in the national banking and FSA systems at that time.  The large banks discussed in the report are
the 18 largest by asset size supervised by the OCC’s large bank supervision
department; the other 69 banks are supervised by OCC’s medium size and
community bank supervision department. 
Underwriting standards refer to the terms and conditions under which
banks extend or renew credit such as financial and collateral requirements,
repayment programs, maturities, pricings, and covenants.

The results showed that underwriting
standards remain largely unchanged
from last year.  OCC examiners reported that those banks that changed
standards generally did so in response to shifts in economic outlook, the
competitive environment, or the banks risk appetite including a desire for
growth.  Loan portfolios that experienced
the most easing included indirect consumer, credit cards, large corporate,
asset base lending, and leverage loans. 
Portfolios that experienced the most tightening included high
loan-to-value (HLTV) home equity, international, commercial and residential
construction, affordable housing, and residential real estate loans.

Expectations regarding future health of
the economy
differed by bank and loan products but examiners reported that
economic outlook was one of the main reasons given for easing or tightening
standards.  Others were changes in risk
appetite and product performance. Factors contributing to eased standards were changes
in the competitive environment, increased competition and desire for growth and
increased market liquidity. 

The survey indicates that 77% of
examiner responses reflected that the overall level of credit risk will remain
either unchanged or improve over the next 12 months.  In last year’s survey 64% of the responses
showed an expectation for improvement in the level of credit risk over the
coming year. Because of the significant volume of real estate related loans,
the greatest credit risk in banks was general economic weakness and its results
and impact on real estate values.   

Eighty-four of the surveyed banks (97
percent) originate residential real estate loans.  There is a slow continued trend from
tightening to unchanged standards with 65 percent of the banks reporting
unchanged residential real estate underwriting standards.  Despite the many challenges and uncertainties
presented by the housing market, none of the banks exited the residential real
estate business during the past year however examiners reported that two banks
plan to do so in the coming year.  Additionally,
examiners indicated that quantity of risk inherent in these portfolios remained
unchanged or decreased at 81% of the banks.

Similar results were noted for
conventional home equity loans with 68% of banks keeping underwriting standards
unchanged and 18% easing standards since the 2001 survey.  Of the six banks that originated high
loan-to-value home equity loans, three banks have exited the business and one
plans to do so in the coming year

Commercial real estate (CRE) products
include residential construction, commercial construction, and all other CRE
loans.  Almost all surveyed banks offered
at least one type of CRE product and these remain a primary concern of examiners
given the current economic environment and some banks’ significant
concentrations in this product relative to their capital.  A majority of banks underwriting standards
remain unchanged for CRE; tightening continued in residential construction and
commercial (21 percent and 20 percent respectively).  Examiners site cited the distressed real
estate market, poor product performance, reduced risk appetite and changing
market strategy as the main reasons for the banks net tightening.

Nineteen banks (22 percent) offered
residential construction loan products but recent performance of these loans
has been poor and many banks have either exited the product or significantly
curtailed new originations.

Of the loan products surveyed 17% were originated
to sell, mostly large corporate loans, leveraged loans, international credits,
and asset based loans.  Examiners noted
different standards for loans originated to hold vs. loans originated to sell
in only one or two of the banks offering each product.  There has been continued improvement since
2008 in reducing the differences in hold vs. sell underwriting standards and
OCC continues to monitor and assess any differences.

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