Industrial and Multi-family Loans Drive Annual CRE Increase

The Mortgage Bankers Association
(MBA) reports that commercial and multifamily loan originations were down 7
percent in the fourth quarter of 2011 compared to the third quarter but were 13
percent higher than originations in the fourth quarter a year earlier.  The year-over year change was driven by
originations for both industrial and multifamily properties which increased 43
percent and 31 percent respectively from Q4 2010.  On the negative side, retail loans were down
8 percent, loans for healthcare properties fell 24 percent, office properties
were down 29 percent and hotel originations decreased 44 percent.

Quarter over quarter results were
mixed.  There was a 153 percent jump in
originations for health care properties; industrial loans were up 51 percent
and multifamily properties increased 29 percent.  Originations for healthcare properties fell 52
percent, office properties were down 39 percent, and retail property loans
decreased 24 percent.

Looking at lending by investor groups,
commercial bank portfolios were up by 122 percent compared to the fourth
quarter of 2010 and Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae (the GSEs) increased lending 17
percent.  Life insurance companies and
conduits for commercial mortgage backed securities (CMBS) decreased lending by
23 percent and 50 percent respectively.

 On a quarter-over-quarter basis only the GSEs
increased their loans, which rose 34 percent to an all time high.  Conduits for CMBS were down 26 percent, life
insurance companies decreased lending by 23 percent, and commercial bank
portfolios declined by 16 percent.  

“MBA’s Commercial/Multifamily
Mortgage Bankers Origination Index hit record levels for life insurance
companies in the second and third quarters of 2011,” said Jamie Woodwell,
MBA’s Vice President of Commercial Real Estate Research. “In the fourth
quarter, multifamily originations for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac hit a new
all-time high. While the CMBS market continued to be held back by broader
capital markets uncertainty during the past year, others – like the GSEs, life
companies and many bank portfolios – increased their appetite for commercial
and multifamily loans.”

Commercial/Multi-family
Originations by Investor Types

Investor
Type

Origination Volume Index*

% Chg

Q4-Q4

Average Loan Size ($millions)

Q3 2011

Q4 2011

Q3 2011

Q4 2011

Conduits

42

31

-50

30.5

23.9

Commercial
Banks

169

143

122

11.8

7.8

Life
Insurance

282

216

-13

20.5

14.0

GSEs

176

236

17

13.8

14.3

Total

138

129

13

14,9

11.6

*2001 Ave. Quarter = 100

Commercial/Multi-family
Originations by Property Types

Investor
Type

Origination Volume Index*

% Chg

Q4-Q4

Average Loan Size ($millions)

Q3 2011

Q4 2011

Q3 2011

Q4 2011

Multi-family

140

181

31

13.2

13.5

Office

91

56

-29

19.1

11.7

Retail

222

169

-8

20.9

12.3

Industrial

142

214

43

12.4

16.2

Hotel

231

110

-44

39.0

20.1

Health
Care

91

229

-24

7.2

12.4

*2001 Ave. Quarter = 100

…(read more)

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Homeowners Continue Shift Away from Cash-Out Refinancing

Homeowners who refinanced their homes during the fourth
quarter of 2011
either refinanced for about the same amount or actually brought
cash to the table according Freddie Mac. 
Fewer than 15 percent of those who refinanced during the quarter
increased their loan amount by 5 percent or more.  This is the lowest percentage of “cash-out”
borrowers in the 26 years that Freddie has been tracking the statistics.  During those 26 years covering 1985 to 2010
the average percentage of cash-out borrowers was 46 percent.

Thirty-seven percent of refinancing homeowners took out new
loans of approximately the same size as the old loan but nearly half (49
percent) actually brought cash to the table, reducing the amount of the new
loan to a median ratio of .74 of the old loan. 
The percentage of “cash-in” borrowers is also a 26-year record.

The fourth quarter figures are a stark contrast to the
pattern of refinancing during the last years of the housing boom.   During
eight consecutive quarters (Q4 of 2005 to Q3 of 2007) cash-out loans exceeded
80 percent of all refinancing and in none of those quarters did more than 8
percent of homeowners reduce the size of their mortgages when refinancing.

Borrowers who refinanced achieved a new interest rate about
1.4 percentage points lower than their old mortgage, a 26 percent improvement.  These borrowers will save a median of $2,700
during the first year if they have a $200,000 loan.

The 15 percent who did cash out took an estimated $5.5
billion in net equity out of their homes, representing 3.0 percent of the total
refinanced.  This was down from $5.6
billion and 3.7 percent in the third quarter. 
Adjusted for inflation this was the lowest level since the third quarter
of 1995.  During the peak period for
cash-out refinancing, the second quarter of 2006, homeowners cashed out $83.7
billion through refinancing, 31.1 percent of the total value of all transactions.   

Freddie Mac said that the mortgages refinanced had been in
place for a median of four years and the underlying collateral had decreased in
value by a median of 4 percent during that time.  The Freddie Mac House Price Index shows about
a 23 percent decline in its U.S. series during that four year period.  Thus, Freddie Mac says, “Borrowers who refinanced in
the fourth quarter owned homes that had held their value better than the
average home, or may reflect value-enhancing improvements that owners had made
to their homes during the intervening years.” 
This statement does not seem to recognize the possibility these
borrowers had been able to refinance solely because their homes had held value
and thus self-selected their loans for analysis.   

…(read more)

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D.R. Horton Swings to Profit

D.R. Horton swung to the black in its fiscal first quarter on a double-digit jump in home-building revenue and showed optimism for the spring selling season.

Remodelers See Business Improving

Like their home-building counterparts, remodelers
who are members of the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) are
displaying more confidence in their industry than they have in years.  The NAHB’s Remodeling Market Index (RMI) for
the fourth quarter of 2011 which measures remodelers’ sentiments about their
business climate rose to 46.6 its highest level in five year.  In the third quarter the Index was 41.7.

Like the Home Builders Index (HMI) the measures
responses from home builders, the RMI surveys NAHB members who are involved in
remodeling about current market conditions and about indicators of future
conditions.  Scores above 50 for the HMI,
the RMI or their component indices indicate that more respondents view the
market as good than view it as fair.  In
January the HMI hit a 54 month high of 25.

The RMI component measuring current market conditions rose to 48.4 from 43.0
and two of the categories within that index rose significantly.  Market activity related to major additions
rose from 45.2 to 52.3 and minor additions from 45.7 to 50.1

The component measuring future market indicators of
remodeling business rose to 44.8 from 40.4 in the previous quarter and two of
its categories rose over the 50 mark; calls for bids increased from 45.4 to 50.7
and appointments for proposals to 50.1 from 43.3.   The third category, work committed for the
next three months rose only slightly to 31.5 from 29.9.

 “As more consumers remain in their
homes rather than move in this economy, remodelers benefited from a gradual
increase in home improvement activity, taking us to a five-year high,” said
NAHB Remodelers Chairman Bob Peterson, CGR, CAPS, CGP.  “2011 ended on a strong note for the
remodeling industry.”

Scores improved for both future market indicators and current market
conditions in all four regions of the country.  

…(read more)

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Distressed Property Sales, Discounts Steady in Third Quarter

Sales of distressed homes, those in some
stage of foreclosure or bank owned (REO), accounted to 20 percent of all U.S.
home sales during the third quarter of 2011
compared to 22 percent of sales in
the second quarter according to information released Thursday by
RealtyTrac.  One year earlier such
distressed sales represented 30 percent of the housing market.

There were 221,536 such distressed
property sales to third parties, 11 percent fewer than revised second quarter
figures and 5 percent fewer than in the third quarter of 2010.  Pre-foreclosure sales (generally referred to
as short sales) totaled 92,824 sales or 9 percent of all sales, down 9 percent
from the second quarter and nearly identical to the number one year earlier
when pre-foreclosure sales represented 12 percent of the market.  Sales of REO totaled 128,712 properties, down
13 percent quarter over quarter and 8 percent from the previous year.  REO sales made up 12 percent of all sales in
the quarter compared to 13 percent in Q2 and 18 percent of sales a year
earlier.

Prices for distressed homes averaged
$165,322, up one percent from Q2 but down 3 percent from one year earlier.  The average discount from the market price
for distressed properties was 34 percent, the same as in the second quarter of
2011.  The discount one year earlier
averaged 37 percent.  There were
substantial differences, however, between the prices for pre-foreclosure
properties which averaged $191,119, a discount of 24 percent below the average
market price, and REO.  The latter had an
average sales price of $146,437 in the third quarter, a discount of nearly 42
percent, unchanged from Q2 and down from 45 percent a year earlier.  In the second quarter the discount for pre-foreclosed
properties was 23 percent and was it 24 percent in the third quarter of
2011. 

In six states distressed properties
sales accounted for a larger share of the market than the 20 percent national
average.  The states were Nevada (57
percent), California (44 percent), Arizona (43 percent), Georgia (34 percent),
Colorado (26 percent) and Michigan (23 percent).

The states with the largest
discounts for distressed property sales were Missouri (56.5 percent) and Massachusetts
(51 percent.)

…(read more)

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