Price-Rise Plateau

The Green Street Advisors Commercial Property Price Index remained unchanged in January as investors stayed cautious about the direction of the U.S. economy.

January Housing Scorecard Released by HUD, Treasury

The
Departments of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and Treasury issued the
administration’s January Housing Scorecard on Monday.  The report is essentially a summary of
data on housing and housing finance released by public and private sources over
the previous month and/or quarter.  Most
of the data such as new and existing home sales, permits and starts, mortgage
originations, and various house price evaluations have been previously covered
by MND. 

The scorecard incorporates by reference
the monthly report of the Making Home Affordable Program (MHA) through the end
of December.  This includes information
on the universe of MHA programs including the Home Affordable Modification
Program (HAMP), HOPE Now, and Second Lien Modifications and other initiatives. 

Since the
HAMP program began in April 2009 1,774,595 homeowners have entered into trial
loan modifications, 20,074 since the November HAMP report.  About half of these homeowners, 933,327, have
completed the trials and converted to permanent modifications; 23,374
conversions took place during the current report period.  Just over three-quarters of a million of the permanent
modifications are still active.

While the
HAMP program dates to April 2009, it underwent substantial revisions to its
policies and procedures in June 2010, and many of the measures of its
performance are benchmarked at that time. 
Eight-four percent of homeowners who entered a trial modification after
that date have received a permanent modification with an average trial period
of 3.5 months compared to 43 percent who entered a trial prior to the changes.  As of December, 21,002 of the active trials
had been underway for six months or more; in May 2010, the month before the
changes took place, 190,000 trials were six months old or more.  In December every servicer except Ocwen was
above an 80 percent conversion rate.

HAMP
modifications with the largest reduction in mortgage payments continue to
demonstrate the lowest redefault rates.  At
18 months after modification all loans have a 90+ day default rate of 23
percent.  However, loans with a 20
percent or smaller reduction in loan payment are defaulting at the rate of 36.4
percent while loans with a 50 percent payment decrease or greater have a
default rate of 13.3 percent. 

The Home
Affordable Foreclosure Alternatives program offers incentives to homeowners who
wish to exit home ownership through a short sale or deed-in-lieu of
foreclosure.  Thus far 43,368 homeowners
have been accepted into the program and 27,665 transactions have been
completed, the vast majority through a short sale.  More than half of the completed transactions
(18,350) were on loans owned by private investors; 7,711 were portfolio loans
and 1,604 were GSE loans.

There has
been an emphasis in some quarters on reducing the principal balance of
distressed loans since the last HAMP report. 
Some members of Congress have asked for justification from the GSEs as
to why they were not participating in principal reductions and the Treasury
Department recently urged them to do so as well while tripling the incentives
it is paying to other investors to reduce principal.  The HAMP Principal Reduction Alternative
(PRA) has started trial modifications for 63,203 home owners and permanent
modifications for 42,753 of which 40,374 are still active.  The median principal amount reduced in these
modifications is $67,196, a median of 31.1 percent of the principal balance.

Each month
HAMP reports on selected servicer performance metrics.   Servicers
are expected to make Right Party Contact (RPC) with eligible homeowners and
then evaluate their eligibility for HAMP.  HAMP evaluated servicer outreach to 60 days
delinquent homeowners over the previous 12 months (November 2010-December 2011)
and found most services have made RPC at least 85 percent of the time; however
there is a wide range of performance results in terms of completed the evaluations.
 

Servicers
are also expected to identify and solicit homeowners in early stages of
delinquency and, effective October 1, 2011, a higher compensation structure was
put into effect to reward servicers who complete evaluations and place
homeowners in a trial modification within 120 days of first delinquency.  The table below shows the status of major
servicers relative to their eligibility for maximum incentives.

…(read more)

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(Video) Phil Mickelson Relists San Diego Home

Golf champion Phil Mickelson has put his 9,500-square-foot, five-bedroom Tuscan-style home in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif., a wealthy enclave near San Diego, back on the market for the reduced price of $7.1 million.

Geithner Outlines Accomplishments, Future of Financial Reform

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner told
the Financial Stability Oversight Council that the financial system is getting
stronger and safer and that much of the excess risk-taking and careless
financial practices that caused so much damage has been forced out.  However, he said, “These gains will erode
over time if we are not able to put our full reforms into place.”

He outlined the basic framework has been
laid, with new global agreements to limit leverage, rules for managing the
failure of a large firm and the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB)
up and running, and the majority of the new safeguards for derivatives markets proposed.  Geithner ticked off the major accomplishments
of reform.

First, banks now face much
tougher limits on risk which are critical to reducing the risk of large
financial failures and limiting the damage such failures can cause.  The focus in 2012 will be “on defining the
new liquidity standards and on making sure that capital risk-weights are
applied consistently.”

 The new rules are tougher on
the largest banks that pose the greatest risk and are being complemented by
other limits on risk-taking such as the Volcker Rules and limits on the size of
firms and concentration of the financial systems.  These will not apply only to banks but to
other large financial institutions that could pose a threat to financial system
stability and this year the Risk Council will make the first of these
designations.

Second, the derivatives market will,
for the first time, be required to meet a comprehensive set of transparency
requirements, margin rules and other safeguards.  These reforms are designed to move
standardized contracts to clearing houses and trading platforms and will be
complemented with more conservative safeguards for the more complex and
specialized products less amenable to central clearing and electronic
trading.  These reforms, the balance of
which will be outlined this year, will lower costs for those who use the
products, allow parties to hedge against risk, but limit the potential for
abuse, the Secretary said. 

Third, is a carefully designed set
of safeguards against risk outside the banking system and enhanced protections
for the basic infrastructure of the financial markets: 

  • Money market funds will have new
    requirements designed to limit “runs.”
  • Important funding markets like the
    tri-party repo market are now more conservatively structured.
  • International trade repositories are
    being developed for derivatives, including credit default swaps.
  • Designated financial market utilities
    will have oversight and requirements for stronger financial reserves;

Fourth; there will be a stronger set
of protections in place against “too big to fail” institutions.  The key elements are:

  • Capital and liquidity rules with
    tough limits on leverage to both reduce the probability of failure and prevent
    a domino effect;
  • New protections for derivatives,
    funding markets, and for the market infrastructure to limit contagion across
    the financial system;
  • Tougher limits on institutional size;
  • A bankruptcy-type framework to
    manage the failure of large financial firms.
    This “resolution authority” will prohibit bailouts for private
    investors, protect taxpayers, and force the financial system to bear the costs
    of future crisis.

Fifth, significantly stronger
protections for investors and consumers are being put in place including the
CFPB which is working to improve disclosures for mortgages and credit cards and
developing new standards for qualified mortgages.  New authorities are being used to strengthen protections
for investors and to give shareholders greater voice on issues like executive
compensation.

Geithner pointed to the failure of
account segregation rules to protect customers in the MF Global disaster as proof
of the need for more protections and said that the Council will work with the
SEC and the Commodity Futures Trading Council on this problem.   

Moving forward, reforms must be
structured to endure as the market evolves and to work not just in isolation
but to interact appropriately with each other and the broader economy.  “We
want to be careful to get the balance right-building a more stable financial
system, with better protections for consumers and investors, that allows for
financial innovation in support of economic growth.” 

First, he said, we have to make sure
we have a level playing field at home; that financial firms engaged in similar
activity and financial instruments that have similar characteristics are
treated roughly the same because small differences can have powerful effects in
shifting risk to where the rules are softer. 
A level field globally is also important, particularly with reforms that
toughen rules on capital, margin, liquidity, and leverage, as well as in the
global derivatives markets.  “In these areas we are working to discourage
other nations from applying softer rules to their institutions and to try to
attract financial activity away from the U.S. market and U.S. institutions.” 

It is necessary to align the
developing derivatives regimes around the world; preventing attempts to soften
application of capital rules, limiting the discretion available to supervisors
in enforcing rules on risk-weights for capital and designing rules for
resolution of large global institutions.  Also, because some U.S. reforms are different
or tougher from rules in other markets, there needs to be a sensible way to
apply those rules to the foreign operations of U.S. firms and the U.S.
operation of foreign firms.

 The U.S. also needs to move
forward with reforms to the mortgage market including a path to winding down
the government sponsored enterprises (GSEs.) 
The Administration has already outlined a broad strategy, Geithner said,
and expects to lay out more detail in the spring.  The immediate concern is to repair the damage
to homeowners, the housing market, and neighborhoods.  The President spoke this week about the range
of tools he plans to use.  Our ultimate goals
are to wind down the GSEs, bring private capital back into the market, reduce
the government’s direct role, and better target support toward first-time
homebuyers and low- and moderate-income Americans.

Geithner said the new system must
foster affordable rentals options, have stronger, clearer consumer protections,
and create a level playing field for all institutions participating in the
system.  For this to happen without
hurting the broader economy and adding further damage to those areas that have
been hardest hit, banks and private investors must come back into the market on
a larger scale and they want more clarity on the rules that will apply. 

Credit availability is still a problem
and there is a broad array of programs in place to improve access to credit and
capital for small businesses.  As
conditions improve, it is important that we remain focused on making sure that
small businesses, a crucial engine of job growth, have continued access to
equity capital and credit.

Many Americans trying to buy a home
or refinance their mortgage are also finding it hard to access credit, even for
FHA- or GSE-backed mortgages.  The Administration has been working closely
with the FHA and FHFA to encourage them to take additional measures to remove
unnecessary barriers and they are making progress.  They will probably outline additional reforms
in the coming weeks.

Bank supervisors, in the normal
conduct of bank exams and supervision, as well as in the design of new rules to
limit risk taking and abuse, must be careful not to overdo it with actions that
cause undue damage to the availability of credit or liquidity to markets.

Geithner said the U.S. financial
system is getting stronger
, and is now significantly stronger than it was
before the crisis.  Among the achievements:

  • Banks have increased common equity
    by more than $350 billion since 2009.
  • Banks and other financial
    institutions with more than $5 trillion in assets at the end of 2007 have been
    shut down, acquired, or restructured.
  • The asset-backed commercial paper
    market has shrunk by 70 percent since its peak in 2007, and the tri-party repo
    market and prime money market funds have shrunk by 40 percent and 33 percent
    respectively since their 2008 peaks.
  • The financial assistance we provided
    to banks through TARP, for example, will result in taxpayer gains of
    approximately $20 billion.

The Secretary said the strength of
the banks is helping to support broader economic growth, including the more
than 3 million private sector jobs created over 22 straight months, and the 30
percent increase in private investment in equipment and software.  
Broadly, the cost of credit has fallen significantly since late 2008 and early
2009.  Banks are lending more, with commercial and industrial loans to
businesses up by an annual rate of more than 10 percent over the past six
months.  

He concluded by saying that no
financial system is invulnerable to crisis, and there is a lot of unfinished
business on the path of reform.  The reforms are tough where they need to
be tough.  “But they will leave our financial system safer, better able to
help businesses raise capital, and better able to help families finance safely
the purchase of a house or a car, to borrow to invest in a college education,
or to save for retirement.  And they will protect the taxpayer from having
to pay the price of future crisis.”

…(read more)

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Reports Continue to Show Home Price Declines

CoreLogic and Lender Processing Services
(LPS) have each released their most recent Home Price Indices.  CoreLogic’s HPI covers December; LPS’s covers
the month of November.  Here is a quick
review of each.

LPS found that the average home price
for transactions during November was $199.000, down 0.6 percent from the
October average.  This is the fifth consecutive
month that this index has declined. 
Preliminary information on December sales indicates that the HPI might
have lost another 0.8 percent during that month.

When the market peaked in June 2006 the
total value of the U.S. housing inventory covered by LPS was $10.8
trillion.  The value has declined 30.6
percent to $7.5 trillion since that time.

Price changes were consistent across the
country, increasing in 13 percent of the ZIP Codes in the database.  Higher priced homes had somewhat small price
declines than those in the middle and low price categories with the range from
high to low covering only 13 basis points.

CoreLogic issues two sets of indices,
one including sales of distressed properties, the other excluding those
sales.  The HPI for all sales decreased
1.4 percent in December and was down 4.7 percent on an annual basis, the fifth
year in a row that this HPI has declined.   
The Index covering market sales was 0.9 percent higher than in December
2010 which, Core Logic says, gives an indication of the impact distressed sales
are having on the market.  The HPI excluding distressed sales posted its first month -over-month
gain since last July, rising 0.2 percent. 

Of
the top 100 Core Based Statistical Areas as measured by population, 81 showed
year-over-year declines in November compared to 80 that were down on a monthly
basis in November compared to October.

…(read more)

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