Mortgage applications surge amid record-low rates

Mortgage loan applications surged 23% last week, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association, as record-low interest rates convinced many homeowners it was time to refinance into lower-cost loans.

Refinance Applications Surge 26.4% as Rates Set New Lows

Mortgage applications jumped 23.1
percent on a seasonally adjusted basis during the week ended January 13,
2012.  The increase in the Market
Composite Index, a measure of loan application volume maintained by the
Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA) reflected improvements in both the purchase
and refinance business following the traditionally slow Christmas and New Year
holiday period.  On an unadjusted basis
the index increased 38.1 percent.

The Refinance Index increased 26.4
percent
from the week ended January 6 to its highest point since August 8,
2011.  The seasonally adjusted Purchase
Index rose 10.3 percent, returning to pre-holiday levels.  The unadjusted Purchase Index was up 28.4
percent from the previous week and was 2.2 percent higher than during the same
week in 2011.

The four-week moving average for each
index also increased; the Composite Index increased by 5.99 percent, the
seasonally adjusted Purchase Index by 1.96 percent and the Refinance Index by
7.0 percent.

Refinancing took an 82.2 percent share
of all application activity, up from 80.8 percent the previous week and the
highest share since October 22, 2010.  Applications
for adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs) constituted represented a 5.6 percent
share of applications, up two basis points from the previous week.

Purchase Index vs 30 Yr Fixed

Click Here to View the Purchase Applications Chart

Refinance Index vs 30 Yr Fixed

Click Here to View the Refinance Applications Chart

 “Interest
rates
dropped last week due to continuing anxieties regarding the fragile
economic situation in Europe,” said Michael Fratantoni, MBA’s Vice
President of Research and Economics.  “With mortgage rates reaching
new lows, refinance volume jumped and MBA’s refinance index reached its highest
level in the last six months.  Purchase activity also increased as buyers
returned to the market after the holiday season.”

With
the exception of jumbo loans (with balances over $417,500) interest rates continued
their downward trend. Three of the rates, in fact, hit the lowest level in the
history of the MBA applications survey.  The
jumbo rate – for 30-year fixed-rate (FRM) loans – increased to 4.40 percent
from 4.34 percent with points decreasing to 0.37 from 0.47 point.  The effective rate also increased.

Thirty-year
FRM with conforming (under $417,500) balances hit a new low, decreasing to 4.06
percent with 0.48 point from 4.11 percent with 0.41 point. The effective rate
also decreased.

Rates
for FHA guaranteed 30-year FRM were
at 3.91 percent with 0.59 point, the lowest FHA
rate in the history of MBA’s application survey, down from 3.96 percent with 0.72 point.  The effective rate also decreased from the previous week.

The
third all-time low is the 3.33 percent rate with 0.39 point for the 15-year FRM. 
This was a drop from 3.40 percent with 0.37 point rate the previous week.  The effective rate also decreased.

The
average contract interest rate for 5/1
ARMs was unchanged at the record low 2.90 percent established the previous
week.  Points decreased to 0.45 from 0.49.   The
effective rate also decreased from last week.

All
rates quoted are for 80 percent loan-to-value originations and points include
the application fee.

 MBA’s covers
over 75 percent of all U.S. retail residential mortgage applications, and has
been conducted weekly since 1990.  Respondents include mortgage bankers,
commercial banks and thrifts.  Base period and value for all indexes is
March 16, 1990=100.

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FDIC Invites Comments on Stress Test Rules

The Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation (FDIC) has issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPR) for
comment.  The NPR would require the
larger of the banks it regulates to conduct annual capital-adequacy stress
tests.  The tests are one requirement of
the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act and will affect FDIC-insured banks and
savings institutions with assets of more than $10 billion.  The FDIC currently has 23 financial
institutions meeting that criterion

The proposed rule focuses on capital
adequacy and defines a stress test as a process to assess the potential impact
on the bank of economic and financial conditions (“scenarios”) on the
consolidated earnings, losses, and capital of the covered bank over a set
planning horizon.  FDIC said that these
stress tests would be one component of the broader stress testing activities
conducted by the banks which should address the impact of a broad range of
potentially negative outcomes across a broad set of risk types with impacts
beyond capital adequacy along.  These,
however, are beyond the scope of the proposed rule.

Under the NPR each covered bank
would be required to conduct the test annually using the bank’s financial data
as of September 30 of that year.  Where
the parent company structure of the covered bank includes one or more financial
companies, each with assets greater than the $10 billion threshold, the stress
test requirement applies to the parent and to each subsidiary meeting the threshold,
however the FDIC will coordinate with other regulatory agencies to minimize
complexity or duplication of effort.

As proposed, FDIC would provide each
covered bank with a minimum of three sets of scenarios representing baseline,
adverse, and severely adverse economic and financial conditions and each bank would
use these scenarios to calculate the impact on its potential losses,
pre-provision revenues, loan loss reserves and pro forma capital positions for each quarter end within the
planning horizon.

The NPR also describes the content
of the reports institutions are required to publish, and the timeline for
conducting the stress tests and producing the required reports.

FDIC Acting Chairman Martin J.
Gruenberg said, “Both the FDIC and the institutions being tested will
benefit from the forward-looking results that the stress tests will provide.
The results will assist in ensuring an institution’s financial stability by
helping determine whether it has sufficient capital levels to withstand a
period of economic stress.”

The FDIC’s proposal will be
published in the Federal Register with a 60-day public comment period.

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Credit Defaults Increase, Led by Mortgage Markets

Bank cards were the only type of
consumer debt to see a decline in defaults during December according to data
released today by S&P Indices and Experian. 
The S&P Experian Consumer Credit Default Indices showed increased
defaults in both first and second mortgages and in auto loans.  Driven primarily by the increase in mortgage
defaults, the national composite index rose from 2.22 percent in November to
2.24 percent in December, the highest rate since April of 2011.  In December 2010 the Index stood at 3.01
percent.

The default rate for second mortgages increased
from 1.26 percent to 1.33 percent, auto loan defaults rose to 1.27 percent from
1.17 percent and first mortgage defaults increased to 2.19 percent from 2.17
percent.  The default rate for bank cards
however dropped from 4.91 percent to 4.60 percent.  All rates have improved from those of one
year earlier when the default rate for second mortgages was 1.74 percent; first
mortgages, 2.93 percent; auto loans, 1.69 percent; and bank cards, 6.73
percent.

“Led by the
mortgage markets, the second half of 2011 saw a slight reversal of the two-year
downward trend in consumer credit default rates,” says David M. Blitzer,
Managing Director and Chairman of the Index Committee for S&P Indices.
“First mortgage default rates rose for the fourth consecutive month, as did the
composite. Since August, first mortgage default rates have risen from 1.92% to
the 2.19%. The composite also rose those months, from 2.04% to 2.24%.  The
recent weakness seen in home prices is reflected in these data.  Bank card
default rates, on the other hand, were favorable, falling to 4.6% in December.
This is more than a full percentage point below the 5.64% we saw as recently as
July 2011.

S&P Experian data highlighted
five Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs). 
Three of the five showed increases in default rates for the month: Miami
increased from 4.47 percent to 4.73 percent; Dallas from 1.38 percent to 1.56
percent, and Los Angeles to 2.54 percent from 2.53 percent.  Chicago was unchanged at 2.84 percent and New
York decreased from 2.21 percent n November to 2.13 percent in December. 

Blitzer said
of the MSA data, “Given what we know about the mortgage markets, it is likely
that these cities are seeing this recent weakness because their housing markets
have still not stabilized.”


 

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Drop in Refinancing Curtails Application Volume

The Mortgage Composite Index, a measure of loan application
volume, was down 6.7 percent on a seasonally adjusted basis and 6.6 percent
unadjusted during the week ended June 29 compared to the week ended June
22.  The Mortgage Bankers Association
(MBA) released the Composite and other results of its weekly Mortgage
Applications Survey this morning.

The decrease in mortgage volume was attributed to a drop of
8 percent in the Refinance Index which was in turn driven by a drop in
applications for government-backed refinancing loans.  The share of refinancing applications was 78
percent of all applications, down one percentage point from the previous
week.  Applications for HARP refinancing
which is available only to current Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae borrowers have represented
a quarter of all refinancing applications for the last two weeks.

The seasonally adjusted Purchase Index was up one percent
from the previous week.  The unadjusted
Purchase Index rose only slightly from the previous week and was down 7 percent
from the same week in 2011.  

Purchase Index vs 30 Yr Fixed

Click Here to View the Purchase Applications Chart

Refinance Index vs 30 Yr Fixed

Click Here to View the Refinance Applications Chart

Both the contract interest rate and the effective rate for
all loan types decreased during the week and several rates hit new all time
lows
.   The average contract rate for 30-year fixed
rate mortgages
(FRM) with conforming balances ($417,500 or less) decreased to
3.86 percent with 0.41 point from 3.88 percent with 0.40 percent, the lowest
rate for those loans since MBA began tracking them. 

Jumbo 30-year FRM (balances over $417,500) dropped four
basis points to 4.08 percent with points up to 0.38 from 0.35.  This was the second lowest jumbo loan rate in
MBA’s history.   

FHA-backed 30-year FRM also set a new benchmark low with an
average rate of 3.69 percent with 0.46 point compared to 3.71 percent with 0.46
point.   

Fifteen-year FRMs set a new low at 3.20 percent with 0.47
point.  The rate the previous week was
3.24 percent with 0.44 point.

The average 5/1 adjustable rate mortgage (ARM) rate fell to 2.76
percent with 0.45 point, down from 2.81 percent with 0.41 point.  Applications for ARMs represented only 4
percent of all mortgage applications.

All rate quotes are for loans with an 80 percent
loan-to-value ratio and points include the application fee.

The MBA’s weekly survey covers
over 75 percent of all U.S. retail residential mortgage applications, and has
been conducted weekly since 1990.  Respondents include mortgage bankers,
commercial banks and thrifts.  Base period and value for all indexes is
March 16, 1990=100.

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