Obama Pushes Plan to Revive Housing

The president announced a fresh bid to revive housing by letting millions of homeowners refinance their mortgages, despite likely congressional opposition.

Investor Cash Adding Downward Pressure on Home Prices

Cash buyers, principally investors, may
be putting downward pressure on home prices according to the Campbell/Inside
Mortgage Finance Housing Pulse Tracking Survey released Monday.  The survey found that investors with cash in
hand are able to offer something that homeowners dependent on mortgage
financing cannot, a guaranteed sale with a quick closing timeline.  This seems to offset the desirability of a
higher bid with a mortgage contingency.   

The
Housing Pulse survey found that the trade-off between price and speed is
particularly true with offers on distressed properties because the lenders and
servicers liquidating the properties generally prefer transactions that can
settle within 30 days.  The Campbell
report states, “While investor bids may not be the
first offers accepted, they often end up winning properties after other
homebuyers are eliminated because of mortgage approval or timeline problems.
Appraisals below the contracted price are a common reason for mortgage denials.
Most mortgage financing timelines are now in excess of 30 days.”

The
survey reports that 33.2 percent of home buyers in December were cash buyers,
up from 29.6 percent in December 2010. 
However, 74 percent of investors came to the table with cash.  This is especially striking as the survey
found that investors accounted for 22.8 percent of home purchases in December,
changed only slightly from 22.2 percent in November.  But, Campbell says, “Despite their relatively
small share among homebuyers, investors have an outsize effect on home prices because
their bids bring down market prices.”

Real estate agents responding to the
survey commented on the low bids they are seeing from investors.  Campbell quoted anecdotal information from a
few agents indicating they are seeing investor bids 10-20 percent below list
prices, but with quick closings.

The total share of distressed properties
in the housing market in December continued at a three-month moving average of
47.2 percent, the 24th consecutive month that the HousePulse
Distressed Property Index (DPI) was over 40 percent.

The Campbell/Inside Mortgage Finance
HousingPulse Tracking Survey involves approximately 2,500 real estate agents
nationwide each month and provides up-to-date intelligence on home sales and
mortgage usage patterns.

…(read more)

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First Round of Pilot Rental Initiative Completed with 2,500 Homes Sold

The first round of winners has been
selected to purchase foreclosed real estate from Freddie Mac and Fannie
Mae.  The Federal Housing Finance Agency
(FHFA) announced today that 2,500 single family homes had been awarded to successful
bidders under a pilot initiative to convert real estate acquired by the two
government sponsored enterprises (GSE) through foreclosure into rental property. 

Successful candidates for purchasing properties
from the GSE’s real estate portfolio (REO) had undergone several steps in a
qualification process before being permitted to bid on the houses which they had
to agree to hold and rent for a period of time before reselling. 

The properties were offered in sale
pools which were geographically concentrated in various locations across the
United States.  The GSEs, FHFA and other federal
agencies involved, Departments of Treasury, Housing and Urban Development,
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and the Federal Reserve, had several
goals
for the program.  They hoped to
relieve the GSEs of the costs and administrative burdens of managing thousands
of foreclosed properties, alleviate the blight imposed on communities by large
number of vacant and possibly deteriorating properties, increase the rental
stock, while at the same time not flooding the market with distressed
properties.

 FHFA described the response to the pilot
initiative as “robust with strong qualified bidder interest.”  Some 4,000 responses were received to the
initial “Request for Information” issued by the program sponsors last February,
however beyond announcing that the awards had been made FHFA released no
information on the names or even the numbers of successful bidders.

“FHFA
undertook this initiative to help stabilize communities and home values in
areas hard-hit by the foreclosure crisis,” said Edward J. DeMarco, Acting
Director of FHFA. “As conservator of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, we believe
this pilot program will assist us in achieving our objectives and help to
maximize the benefit to taxpayers. We are pleased with the response from the
market and look forward to closing transactions in the near future.”

…(read more)

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Pending Home Sales Rise; NAR Sees Tight Inventory Leading to Price Increases

Pending home sales in May bounced
back to match March numbers which were the highest seen in two years. The
improvement was broad-based, affecting every region in the country according to
the National Association of Realtors® (NAR). 

NAR’s Pending Home Sales Index (PHSI)
rose 5.9 percent in May from 95.5 in April to 101.1, equaling the index level last
March.  This was an increase of 13.3
percent from May 2001 when the index was 89.2. 
The last time the PHSI was higher than the March and May number was in
April 2010 when buyers were rushing to beat the deadline for the home buyer tax
credit.

The PHSI is a forward indicator
reflecting signed contracts for home purchases. 
The index does not include closing transactions which are generally
expected to occur within 60 to 90 days.

Lawrence Yun, NAR
chief economist, said longer term comparisons are more relevant.  “The
housing market is clearly superior this year compared with the past four
years.  The latest increase in home contract signings marks 13 consecutive
months of year-over-year gains,” he said.  “Actual closings for
existing-home sales have been notably higher since the beginning of the year
and we’re on track to see a 9 to 10 percent improvement in total sales for
2012.”

The national
median existing-home price is expected to rise 3.0 percent this year and
another 5.7 percent in 2013.

On a regional
basis, May pending sales in the Northeast increased 4.8 percent to 82.9, 19.8
percent above May 2011.  The pending sales number in the Midwest was 98.9
up 6.3 percent from April and 22.1 percent from a year ago.  The index for
the South increased 1.1 percent month over month and 11.9 percent year over
year to an index of 106.9.  In the West
the index jumped 14.5 percent in May to 108.7 and is 4.8 percent stronger than
a year ago.

Yun said that
low inventory could negatively impact some contract activity.  “If credit
conditions returned to normal and if we had more inventory, especially in the
lower price ranges, more people would become successful buyers.  In an
environment of historically favorable housing affordability conditions, it’s
frustrating to see some consumers thwarted in the process,” he said.

The low
inventory in some cases is because of the numbers of homeowners who are unwilling
to list their homes for sale because they are underwater on their mortgages.  Selling underwater homes requires that sellers
either bring cash to the table or undergo a lengthy and often frustrating short
sale process.  NAR estimates 85 percent
of homeowners have positive equity, with 15 percent in an underwater situation.

“Low inventory
can be cured by increasing new home construction,” Yun said.  He projects
housing starts to rise by 26 percent this year and another 50 percent in 2013.  “If housing starts do not rise in a meaningful
way over the next two years due to the difficulty in getting construction
loans, and barring an unexpected shift in the economy, the steady shedding of
inventory could lead to shortages where home prices could get bid up close to
10 percent in 2013,” Yun said.

…(read more)

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A Reinvention in Michigan

A Rust Belt community on the shores of Lake Michigan is about to get another boost in its unlikely bid to reinvent itself as a resort destination named Harbor Shores.